Anyone who makes art must also be able to present themselves in writing. And if you write, you also have to think about language.In some cases, this can go far beyond simple questions of spelling and grammar. So today’s article is a little less about art itself than about linguistic questions. More precisely about inclusive language. Coincidentally, many years ago I completed a linguistic degree with a focus on linguistics. Even then, I was very interested in feminist linguistics and how women appear in language. I could never describe myself as a student, artist, resident, etc. It seems strange to me to use a masculine form for myself. I do not want to present the whole topic in detail at this point, nor do I want to discuss it in detail. Who is interested in I am happy to have a private exchange with me. Today I would just like to introduce you to a few possibilities how you can practice inclusive language – and I will partly evaluate these presented possibilities personally.

headlines

“For the sake of better readability, the use of male and female forms of speech is not used. All personal names apply to both genders. “

In this way or similar, I often read a note in front of longer texts in which the masculine form is used almost exclusively. Strangely enough, this option is also mostly used by male scribes. Personally, I consider this possibility to be the worst – if I want to accept it as such at all … It feels like a carelessly thrown note that resembles a legal disclaimer. To put it quickly, you don’t have to worry about it afterwards and you are fine. For me, this variant does not change anything in the subjective perception that I am missing feminine forms in the following and that I do not feel addressed.

Headings (1)

“I was very happy about the large number of visitors to my vernissage.”

Just as I am addressing the “ladies AND gentlemen” in the introduction to a speech, for reasons of courtesy I consider it appropriate to address both genders specifically in other contexts if I want to reach them emotionally as an artist. Disadvantage: It can make some texts or individual formulations appear cumbersome and drawn out a lot, especially if several personal names are piling up one after the other.

Headings (2)

“I was very happy about the many visitors at my vernissage.”

In the early phase of the discussion about the inclusive naming of both sexes, this form was found quite often. Today it is no longer really up-to-date, mainly because the women look like an appendage. I can therefore not recommend this option.

Headings (3)

“I was very happy about the large number of visitors to my vernissage.”

Next came the use of the large Inner-I . First of all at universities, it already caught on in the 1990s. Today you see it less, mainly because the intellectual development and with it the practice of inclusion has taken another step forward (see next possibility).

Headings (4)

“I was very happy about the many visitors at my vernissage.”

For some time this has Gender Gap (Engl. Gender = Gender Gap = gap) spread. One takes into account here that the terms “man” and “woman” are social genders, but alongside or in between there are many other possibilities for one’s own gender identity. If you want to find out more about it here:

Headings (5)

“I was very happy about the many visitors at my vernissage.”

Another variant, which is not only very similar to the previous one, but is more or less the same, is the Gender Star or Asterisk. Since I only found out about this spelling in the last few months, I asked the blogger Sabine Küster , who uses it, if she can tell me more about it. I received the following reason: “… because the star-dusted also want to be taken.” Well, I have to say, that is the best argument for me and I will switch to starlets in the future! 🙂 (But there are probably other good reasons too … 😉)

Headings (6)

“I was very happy about the many guests at my vernissage. There was a lot of laughter . Hilda Meier gave an engaging speech. Those who make art themselves (instead of “other artists”) could get a lot of ideas here. You felt good and stayed until midnight. “

After all, the German language offers a variety of completely different possibilities: “man”, possibly “woman”, generally formulated passive sentences, naming, paraphrasing, neutral formulations.) That requires – admittedly – a very conscious use of language and it may take time a little longer until the text is finished. If you want to be even more precise, you can turn “who” into “which”. There are many opportunities…

Headings (7)

A last option is to use different variants (I personally prefer 2, 3, 6 and 7) alternately and thus ensure a good mixture. However, one should not switch back and forth between variants 3, 4, 5 and 6; it looks better here if you decide on a variant. In general, however, good text work requires that sentence structure and formulations are used in a varied manner. The desired effect is when the text creates a reading flow that does not even tempt the reader to think big about the form, but when it simply works through strong content.